Our First Major Fracture

We’ve known all along that FangFang’s osteogenesis imperfecta would mean that she’d be highly susceptible to bone fractures, and we were a bit relieved when, in January, we experienced what we believe was her first fracture since coming home. We made it through that and breathed a sigh of relief! It was relatively mild, though – we weren’t even sure anything was going on until the morning after it happened. And honestly, it made this OI mama gig seem pretty easy!

But this week we had our first real, major fracture. FangFang’s newest skill, of which she is immensely proud, is that she can go up and down the stairs by herself. She sits on her bottom and scoots herself up or down one stair at a time, and while I wouldn’t let her do it totally unsupervised, she’s been pretty consistently safe.

We invited some friends to come over for a low-key hangout to celebrate the 4th of July, and while they were here, FangFang was going from me (upstairs) to Matt (downstairs in the studio), and as she was scooting from one step to the next, I heard a crack, and then she started crying very loudly. FangFang has a flair for the dramatic, so it wasn’t as much the intensity of her cry that alerted me to the fact that this was something serious, but rather its persistence and her self-splinting of her leg (positioning her other foot underneath it) to protect it. I scooped her up right away and carried her upstairs and offered a bit of comfort and had Matt go get our break box from upstairs.

We gave her the heavy duty pain meds that we keep on hand for these exact situations and splinted her leg. Nothing looked displaced, and the 4th of July is probably one of the dates on which I would least like to go to the Emergency Room – I am pretty uninterested in spending the evening competing for medical care with people who have experienced fireworks accidents, and I’d rather we not be the guinea pig for the new residents. We opted to medicate and splint at home, knowing we’d call the orthopedic surgeon in the morning to try to get some x-rays to make sure additional treatment wasn’t warranted. There was quite a bit of crying, but we got her splinted and calmed down and set up watching tv.

Then it wasn’t long before, thanks to the intense meds, she slept for a couple hours before waking up in pain again. I felt so bad for her – at that point, I really could only give her Tylenol and Ibuprofen, nothing more yet, and she was clearly in a lot of pain. I texted and then even called another OI mama and asked her what I should do. She said this really just is how it goes with this sort of fracture, that there wouldn’t be much more they could do at the ER, and we needed to stay on top of pain meds and just do all we could to keep her distracted. She was a lot happier once we gave her an iPad she could control herself (she likes to switch videos every 7 seconds or so!) instead of just putting one show on the tv. We were so thankful that something helped!

Thanks to her nap, she stayed up fairly late that night, and thanks to the intense pain meds, she was a little loopy, chatting with Matt and me about all sorts of topics!

We brought down a travel cot for her, so she’d be a little more comfortable without us having to carry her all the way up the stairs and jostle her getting her into and out of her crib, and I slept on the living room couch next to her, so I could be nearby if she needed me and could also stay on top of pain meds during the night.

She spent most of the next morning with my iPad. With a good pain med schedule, no movement, and an iPad, she was reasonably comfortable, but without any of those things, she was in quite a bit of pain. That meant that going to the ortho for x-rays that morning was pretty agonizing for her. I put her in her stroller once we arrived to minimize the amount of moving of her leg I’d need to be doing, but we still needed to move her to get x-rays and then to re-splint.

The x-rays confirmed what I’d suspected, a significant tibia fracture. They also showed what I’d hoped for, though, that there was no displacement and no treatment needed beyond splinting.

The nurse practitioner started removing the splint I’d put on before I realized what was happening – I haven’t quite mastered the OI mom skill of (1) comforting your hurting, crying child while (2) talking to medical professionals and (3) monitoring all medical professionals in the room to make sure they’re not doing anything you don’t want them to do. Truthfully, it wasn’t the greatest splint, and I knew it wasn’t great, but we’d been trying to get it on and stable while FangFang was in a huge amount of pain, so I was satisfied that it met the basic criterion of immobilizing the joints above and below, and I figured I’d re-splint with a better one in a few days once the pain went down. But once it was already off, I agreed that we might as well put on a better one. I was nervous about not doing it totally myself – we’ve heard some horror stories about medical professionals not understanding how to work with kids with OI bone – but I was actually very impressed with the guy who does the casting and splinting at our orthopedic surgeon’s office. He and I worked together to put on a new splint with minimal trauma to FangFang, though she still hated it, but now we’re all set for a few weeks.

For FangFang, Wednesday was really a day comprised almost entirely of lying on her little cot and watching videos on my iPad.

That prompted some jealousy, and some older siblings may have confessed to stomping their feet on the floor as hard as possible in attempts to break their own legs and get extra tv time. Technology envy is alive and well at our house 🙂

Thankfully – for everyone’s sake! – FangFang was feeling much better by yesterday. She got off her cot and started scooting herself around again, she played with siblings, we were able to wean down to just Tylenol and Ibuprofen, and she was so much more herself.

I’m still pretty bummed about the fracture – sad for FangFang that it had to happen at all and sad about the timing of it. Though it was nice at times to have some extra adults around, there are many ways in which it’s not ideal to fracture your leg in the midst of a party at your house! And my big girls were bummed to miss out on going to fireworks on the 4th. It’s also the beginning of July – basically the middle of summer around here – and I so love getting to take everyone to the pool, and while technically I could let her get her splint wet and then just re-splint with a new one afterwards, we won’t want to take this one off for at least a week and a half, so she – and we – will miss out on some pool time. But ultimately I’m thankful she’s doing so well now, and I’m thankful it wasn’t any worse than it is!

Meet Keena, Jefferson, and Rosie

As you’re likely aware if we are friends on Facebook or you follow me on Instagram, our family has recently grown again! Meet Keena, Jefferson, and Rosie!

from left to right, Jefferson, Rosie, and Keena

It was a bit of a journey to get them. It started when I arrived home from our church’s women’s retreat the first weekend of May to an excited announcement from the kids that there were cats in our yard! Apparently, as they’d been playing outside, they’d seen a mama cat and kittens who seemed to be living under our sunroom in the back yard. After soliciting advice on Facebook from our cat-expert friends, we decided we’d try to get them to warm up to us, so we could trap them and take them to get spayed and neutered, and we’d try to find good homes for them. And after some discussion between Matt and me, we told the kids that we could probably keep two of the kittens.

Actually, years ago, when people would ask if we had any pets, we’d look at them like they were crazy and respond that when we had the time, energy, and money to devote to another being, we’d have babies – and so we did. But now, four babies later, we think our family has all the kiddos it’s going to have. And we’ve seen the positive ways in which our children have responded to animals. And while having pets does complicate travel and does add additional responsibilities within our home, we’ve talked with friends who are cat-owners, and we’ve come to believe that adding cats to our family could be manageable.

Thus began our brief attempts to tame the cats in our back yard. We put out some soft food, which mama cat and the kittens began to eat.

I stood outside while mama cat ate, trying to get her used to my presence, so I could hopefully get close enough in the days that would follow to trap her and her kittens. Unfortunately, my presence had the opposite effect – it seems I spooked her, and we’re pretty sure that mama cat moved her little family elsewhere. We saw her a few times – always at a distance and never when we were outside – after that, but we haven’t seen the kittens since.

Our kiddos were pretty bummed and began carrying around the cat carrier we’d purchased, just practicing for the day when we could get cats for real.

After a couple days of no kitten sightings, I began researching our options for getting cats, and we decided that for our family, the ideal situation really would be to bring home some kittens. It’s definitely harder to find families for older cats…but it’s also harder for older cats to adjust to a family with many young, active children. And after reading and talking with friends about the benefits of having multiple cats, we decided we’d try to bring home 2 kittens.

Because we are us, and once a decision is made, we move, we went out that afternoon and met and played with some kittens, and that evening, we welcomed Keena and Jefferson into our family!

There was just one problem…Keena and Jefferson were part of a litter of 3 cats. I am quite sentimental, and I couldn’t stop thinking about and feeling bad for the 1 cat we’d left behind, and neither could our big girls. That night I talked to Matt, and the next afternoon I loaded the kids up into the car, and we went back to get our third kitten, now named Rosie, before anyone else could come and get her.

They are very playful!

And Madeleine CaiQun does a great job of playing with them!

But as all kittens do, they also require a great deal of sleep, which is quite adorable 🙂

We’re finding that our hypothesis is probably correct, that it’s best for our family, with our many young children, to have kittens. Atticus, in particular, requires a lot of coaching about how to treat cats with kindness and gentleness, but all of the kittens are pretty tolerant even of him!

The cats have been great snuggling companions for everyone, which has been a blessing. Everyone needs to know that they are unconditionally loved and accepted, and while Matt and I do our best to communicate our love and acceptance to all of our children, we understand that there’s also a lot of teaching and discipline in our relationships with our kids. At more difficult times, the predominant emotional sense our kids have of our relationship may not be positive, and they may not be able to receive a lot of affection from us – but the kittens will curl up on their laps and allow themselves to be petted, all the while emitting motor-like purrs of satisfaction and approval, which is so encouraging and helpful for all of our kiddos. Curling up with a kitten has definitely become another strategy in our toolbox for helping dysregulated children.

Bringing kittens into the family has added some expense and some work and a few more appointments to our lives, but overall it has been a very positive experience, and we’re glad we’ve embarked upon this journey of pet ownership!

Post-Surgery Update

It’s been a while since I’ve written – too long – and I miss this space. I have more to say and share here, but first I want to start with an overdue update on FangFang’s surgery and recovery. My last post was written the night before surgery. In the morning, we were up and checked out of our hotel and arrived at the hospital by 6:45, our designated check-in time.

Her surgeon actually saw us in the lobby while we were checking in and came over and talked with us. He said he might end up only rodding her right leg – that was the first I’d heard of this plan to potentially leave the left femur alone, and it left me anxious that we’d have to go through this surgery twice in a short span of time, instead of getting the recovery period for both legs over with all at once. There is a reason that we travel to Omaha, though – Dr. Esposito is one of the best (if not the absolute best) pediatric orthopedic surgeons working with children with OI, and we’d have to trust his judgment.

Overall, we were pretty impressed with the team in place in Omaha as we talked with them in preparations for surgery and as they helped FangFang get acclimated.

We had only one unpleasant interaction – one of the pre-op nurses had asked us to get out a favorite blanket or stuffed animal for FangFang that she could take back to the OR with her, so we did that, only to be told by the nurse who was wheeling her back for surgery that she wasn’t really supposed to have her own things with her – but when FangFang protested and I argued that the other nurse had specifically encouraged us to get out her blanket, she was allowed to take it back with her.

Once FangFang went back to the OR, my mom and I ate breakfast (FangFang was NPO in preparation for her surgery, and this girl loves her food – no way were we going to be able to eat in front of her without feeding her!) and then sat in the waiting room and did a bit of work.

I was initially disappointed when the nurse came out to tell me that they’d finished with her right femur and were not going to touch her left, but when Dr. Esposito and Dr. Wallace came to talk with us, they said it was because the rod in her left leg actually looked better than they expected, and they didn’t think they could get it much better right now, so they’d rather not touch it, and hopefully we’d get a couple years out of it. I could live with that!

The before and after pictures are pretty striking. You can see the extreme curve in her femur as it was before surgery (and the way it lights up bright white, indicating that it has broken and healed that way over numerous untreated or poorly treated fractures, which makes my heart ache). And then you can see how much straighter it looks now with the rod placed. Of course, the surgeons had to break her femur in two places in order to straighten it, which is a major cause of the pain she experienced after surgery.

I was allowed to go back to FangFang soon after that, once she started waking up, and she immediately started crying and asked for me to hold her and wanted food. The nurses warned me that giving her too much food and drink too soon would likely upset her tummy, but as a mama of a child who has experienced food insecurity and who senses safety in part through the availability of food, I made the choice to let her eat and drink more than would usually be offered.

Nervous about hurting her, fresh out of surgery and with so many wires attached, I did leave her on the bed and just wrap my arms around her while we were in post-op, but as soon as we were up on the floor, the nurses helped me get her onto my lap, where she settled in much more happily.

And there I was rewarded for my liberality in dispensing apple juice and jello with several instances of projectile vomit! We got ourselves cleaned up, though, and FangFang slept for much of that first afternoon, leaving my lap only when it was absolutely necessary.

We tucked her into bed at night time, but none of us slept all that well – she still had an epidural in for pain control, and with that, they were checking vitals every 2 hours. The next morning we talked with the pain management team about getting rid of the epidural and transitioning to IV and then oral pain meds. They have a good strategy in place, in which they turn off the epidural but leave it in and see how the patient responds, and if they need the epidural meds, they can always turn it back on. FangFang definitely experienced more discomfort without it than with it, but everyone agreed that her pain seemed manageable, and she appreciated not having to be hooked up to so many wires. She, again, spent most of the day sitting on my lap. We watched some Daniel Tiger DVDs and played with a doctor kit Matt’s cousin ordered for her from the gift shop.

And in the evening we went for a ride in the wagon, which she loved. She so wanted to get out of that hospital room!

While we were out for our walk, I grabbed a photo of these signs hanging on our door. Everything about the Omaha Children’s Hospital speaks to their expertise in interacting with children with OI. It’s not just that Dr. Esposito is so amazing – though he is – it’s that everyone there is experienced in working with kids with OI and knows how to do so.

As wonderful as the hospital is, we’d really much rather be home. We advocated for a discharge as early as possible, and everyone was on board with us leaving the hospital and heading home Thursday morning, earlier than we’d thought possible, for which we were all thankful!

We were able to keep her pain well managed with just the oral pain meds – honestly, she seemed more disturbed by the pain from removing bandaids than by any pain associated with the femur fractures and surgery itself! – and within a few days of our arrival home, we were able to wean her off of the heavy duty meds, down to just Tylenol and Ibuprofen.

We were all glad to be home and be together. For the first day or two, FangFang didn’t move around much, but this girl wasn’t going to let anything like a post-op femur rodding slow her down for too long – within a couple days of our arrival home, she was scooting around the house just like normal. She hated having the splint on, but she tolerated it, and we’d give her short reprieves for a bath or, once she was three weeks post-op, to let her sleep without it. That wasn’t exactly doctor approved, but she was sleeping horribly with it, and consequently Matt and I were sleeping horribly, and we just hoped we weren’t being horribly foolish!

Our instructions were to keep her non-weight-bearing for 4 weeks and then we could remove the splint and go in for follow-up x-rays with our local orthopedic surgeon, which we did at exactly the 4 week mark. Everything looked good on x-rays, so she was cleared to return to normal activity, for which we are all very thankful!

FangFang is back to crawling again, and she and I have been going to aqua therapy – physical therapy in the water. Aqua therapy is particularly awesome for kids with OI, because they’re able to work on developing skills without having to support all of their weight to do so. She’s doing great with supporting increasingly more of her weight while standing, and last week we started working on taking some steps and cruising. She’s just starting to get the motions down for that, which means I support most of her weight while she works on it, and my arms were sore after our last session! She is growing and developing and working on gaining those skills, though, which is so exciting to see.

This phase of the journey is a bit more unpredictable. I knew we’d need to get FangFang into PT, I knew we’d work toward getting her to stand and walk, and I knew she’d need her right femur rodded before she got too far along toward those goals – but now that her surgery has happened, it’s impossible to say how quickly she’ll begin to stand and maybe even walk on her own. She is motivated and excited about each new milestone she reaches, and we’ll just have to see what the next months hold for her and for us!

Surgery Tomorrow Morning

Tomorrow morning we take an important step in this journey of living life with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). FangFang is scheduled for bilateral femur rodding surgery. For those of you who would enjoy a detailed explanation, feel free to check out this link from the OI Foundation. The short version is that right now, her bone density is very low, and her right femur has significant bowing (curving). That means that if she were to try to pull to a stand (something she has been starting to attempt recently), chances are high that her femur would snap. Try to imagine for a moment the pain that would be involved in a significant break of this largest bone in your body, and you’ll understand why we’d like to avoid that scenario. Her left femur fractured about 10 months ago in China, and she had a rod placed in that leg at that time, but it will be replaced during this surgery, and her right femur will be rodded for the first time. These rods will act as internal splints, straightening the bones, giving them added strength and stability, and lessening the severity of any fractures that do occur in the future.

FangFang’s orthopedic surgeon recommended this course of action when we saw him in January, and it is the consensus of the other parents with whom we’ve spoken that it is absolutely the best choice for her. And so, instead of spring break on the beach or exploring a fun area nearby or just enjoying some quality family time at home, we have spring break: bilateral femur rodding edition.

My mom and FangFang and I made the 5 hour drive to Omaha this afternoon and got settled into our hotel room, where we hope to get some sleep before an early hospital check-in tomorrow morning.

Would you please pray for us this week as we tackle surgery and these first few days of recovery? In particular, these are some things for which we’d very much appreciate prayer –

  • that the surgery itself goes well. The surgeons performing her surgery are some of the very best surgeons in the world who specialize in caring for children with OI, and they have done this exact same operation innumerable times, and we have full confidence in them, but no surgery is ever routine when it’s for your child.
  • that we are able to manage her pain – both physical and potentially emotional – well over the next few days. Physical pain after this particular surgery is intense, and we, as well as the nurses involved in her care, will need to stay ahead of her pain with the best medications for her. Additionally, we’ve done all we can to explain what’s going to happen and read books and show her pictures, and I’m as confident as I can be for a 3-year-old who has been exposed to English for just over 3 months that she’s well-prepared, but it’s hard to know how much she understands. She’s going to wake up after surgery with an epidural and double leg splints. She’s such a happy kiddo, and I’m hoping she won’t be too distraught by her situation this week.

  • that my mom and I are able to comfort and entertain her well this week. She’s going to be in pain, and she’s going to have very limited mobility. We’re going to need to be creative and hands on in our parenting (and grandparenting) to care for her well, and while I’m hoping for some bits of down time, I don’t really know what to expect, and I know I need to be prepared for some long days and nights.
  • that Matt and our other 3 kids can have fun together during this week at home. Honestly, I think he has the harder parenting job this week, caring for 3 kids by himself 24/7 (except for brief breaks offered by a friend, for which I am SO thankful – having a couple hours to himself to run to the gym is going to make his job so much easier!).

  • that we can head home early. I’ve been told that if everything goes well, we can hope for discharge on Thursday or Friday, then they’d like us to spend another night in town, and we’d be able to head home the next day. I’d really like to be able to head home ASAP. I don’t enjoy being away from Matt and the rest of our kids, and I think FangFang will be much happier at home with her brother and sisters than stuck in a hospital room. Even tonight, as she was falling asleep in her hotel pack ‘n’ play, she repeated several times, “Night night, Atta.”
  • that we’re able, as a family, to care for FangFang well even as we return home. I really don’t know what these next few weeks will look like, and I want to be flexible with our daily routines and with school and with my expectations of what things will look like, and I hope we can all be selfless in our care for her during her recovery.
  • that the rods do their job well. FangFang very much wants to be able to stand, and we believe (and all the medical professionals with whom we interact believe) that having rods in her femurs will help her to do so safely, and we hope that is the case.

I’ll keep you informed as I’m able. Thanks so much for joining us in prayer as we take this step forward with our baby girl!

Homeschooling 2016-2017 – Mid-Year Update

It’s been rather a while since I’ve written about our progress with homeschooling this year, so I think we’re due for an update! I wrote in detail about our curriculum choices for this school year here, and we are in large part finding that those are working well.

Our curriculum outline lays out a pathway for getting through all of its materials in 180 days (36 weeks). By the time I left for China in December, we’d made it through 11 weeks of curriculum, something about which I sometimes felt a significant amount of stress. I knew life was only going to get crazier once FangFang came home, and I was worried that we’d never finish “on time” if we couldn’t even get through a third of the material before I left. Fortunately, there actually is no “on time” in homeschooling, particularly in these early elementary years. It doesn’t really matter if you read about the fall of Rome 10 months or 14 months after you start with Creation. And actually, we’ve been moving faster post-adoption than we did pre-adoption (go figure). In the 4 months between starting this school year and heading to China, we made it through 11 weeks of curriculum; in the 2.5 months since Christmas, we’ve accomplished 8.5 weeks of study. Phew! We will eventually finish 🙂

We’ve definitely had to revise our routine since our homecoming, though. I’ve found that math has to happen first thing in the morning, or it doesn’t happen at all. It’s my girls’ biggest “workbook” type subject, and they don’t have the focus or the patience for it later in the day, whereas if they start with it, they work through it pretty quickly and do a good job. We’ve actually made some changes in Madeleine CaiQun’s math curriculum. I’d started the year with Singapore grade 1 math for her, and I’d known within a few weeks that it might not work for her for the whole year. The program is very heavy on mental math and on grasping numbers as abstractions, and she just doesn’t see things that way right now, so nothing was sticking. Right now I have her doing some Rod & Staff workbooks to really solidify basic addition and subtraction facts in her mind, and once she finishes those I’ll make a decision about what to have her do next. I love that we can investigate and find resources that work well for each child as needed!

After we tackle math, we usually have a bit of play time, and then we move on to “reading school,” by which I mean Bible, History, Geography, Literature, Science, Language Arts, and Reading – all of the subjects whose focus centers around my reading out loud to the girls. I always envisioned us snuggling on the couch and reading together, but it turns out that small children’s vision does not always coincide with mine, particularly when the littles are incorporated into the day 🙂 Usually I bring out some toys with which all the kiddos can play while I read, and it’s been a process to learn which toys work best. Trains still require my assistance to build a good track, so those work only if we build the track before launching into school.

Wooden blocks, Duplos, Whittle World, and Magna Tiles are all good options for us. The general rule for the big girls is that as long as they can play without talking and interrupting while I read and they can talk with me about what we’re reading when I ask questions, they’re welcome to play during reading time! We obviously do a lot of parenting-everyone-mixed-with-school, but we’ve found that it works well for us. We’re usually done with our school day before lunch, and in the event that we’re not, we just pick up whatever we have left to do in the afternoon, either after lunch or after rest time. Then I leave our literature reading for bedtime, which is a much more relaxed, snuggly atmosphere in which to get through those longer portions of fun reading.

The littles have completely given up napping for me, and I’ve decided to embrace it. I could keep fighting for it and block off hours of every afternoon for my generally-fruitless attempts to get them to sleep, which produce high levels of frustration for everyone, or I can just accept the fact that for whatever reason, this is our new reality, and we need to make our choices in light of that fact. It actually frees up our day quite a bit. It means we have more room for walks and park outings. We don’t have to finish school before lunch. I can let the kids play longer when things are going well. I’d dreaded this milestone, but I’m actually enjoying it, though I am pretty wiped out by the time Matt gets home in the evenings.

Anyway, in terms of school itself, we’re enjoying what we’re learning. I appreciate the early exposure to some topics I don’t remember covering until much later. We’ve learned some Greek and Roman history and read some mythology, which was a lot of fun. Most recently we are learning about ancient China, reading about the Great Wall, and enjoying some stories set in China, which has obviously been a great connection for our family! The girls are learning about nouns and verbs and memorizing some poetry. We finished a long unit centered around animals and are now studying the human body. We’re talking a lot about the Holy Spirit right now as we study the Bible, and we’re memorizing some Bible verses related to things we’re working through personally right now. Most recently, Miranda and MeiMei and I memorized Psalm 103:8 – “The Lord is compassionate and gracious, slow to anger, abounding in love,” reminding ourselves of who God is and how He calls us to follow after Him in acting in compassion, grace, slow-ness to anger, and love, but He also makes it possible for us to do so. Right now we’re talking about how God has a different path for each of us, but we can all follow Him in the individual things we’re doing, and we’re memorizing Ephesians 2:10 – “For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared beforehand, that we should walk in them.” It’s fun that the littles also ask to have turns repeating the Bible verses as we work on them, and I enjoy including them in those small ways as we go through our school days! We also do just a few things that are truly centered around them, singing songs together, reading simpler books, and working on shapes and colors.

The big girls have continued to do gymnastics, with Miranda in particular starting to develop her own goals there – namely to climb the rope all the way to the top of the ceiling and ring the bell. She’s been working hard, and last weekend she was able to accomplish her goal!

Additionally, we try to take advantage of opportunities that present themselves for us to take the kids out to special events. A few weeks ago, the big girls and I went to see the ZuZu African Acrobats with some friends from church.

And last weekend, we went to a Mandarin for Tots activity at the library. We attend a number of art-related events, as well. Obviously most of our social interaction occurs within the context of our family, but we’re also attempting to teach our kids how to engage with our community, too.

We’re also embarking upon a new adventure in schooling – we’re officially enrolling FangFang in public school. However, she won’t actually attend school outside of our home. In our efforts to do everything possible to make sure she has every chance to grow and develop to her potential, we went ahead and had her evaluated by the local school district, and her delays are significant enough that she qualifies for services. However, given the current fragility of her bones and the fact that we are still very much working on building attachment, everyone agrees that the best place for her right now is at home. I’ve heard horror stories from parents pursuing and working through IEPs for their children, but honestly, we’ve had an incredibly positive experience. It’s pretty awesome to me that in these assessments and meetings we’ve had to evaluate her development and discuss the best possible situations for her, there have always been at least 3 adults (usually more) from the school district involved and offering their input and expertise. Everyone has been happy to answer my questions and to listen to what I had to say – whether about the effects of osteogenesis imperfecta or our focus on attachment – and thus far, it has been a very positive experience. The current plan is that a special education teacher and a physical therapist will come to our home (or we can meet at a park or someplace where we can work on some of our PT goals) once a week for 30 minutes, and an occupational therapist will join them every other week. I’m excited to get started working with them and see how they can add to our efforts to help FangFang grow and develop!

Overall, I am really enjoying our school year, and I love getting to work with the big girls on formal school activities but also give them hours of time to play and enjoy being kids. I am thankful for the opportunity to homeschool and look forward to continuing to learn together!