Heading to Omaha This Week!

Later this week we’re packing up and heading to Omaha for their OI clinic! Why, you might ask, would we do that?

When we were reviewing FangFang’s file, before committing to pursuing adopting her, we’d gotten in touch with our pediatrician, who reached out to one of the orthopedic surgeons in the area. He let us know what treatment would generally entail (surgeries and bisphosphonate infusions) and said that care could all be handled locally. And it likely could. So why travel? Why, in fact, change our insurance coverage to a different, likely more expensive plan, solely so that we could travel?

Osteogenesis imperfecta is an extremely rare condition. Approximately 25,000 – 50,000 people in the United States are estimated to be affected with OI – which means that in a country with a population of approximately 324,349,000, less than 0.02% of the population is affected. There is an OI Clinic right here at Mizzou, which, based on the most current data, sees…6 people per year. In contrast, in the same year, the clinic in Omaha saw 176 people. That number is still so low – but it’s almost 30 times higher than the number seen at Mizzou. The doctors involved with the OI Clinic at Omaha Children’s Hospital are recognized internationally as experts in caring for children with OI. Their research relates to OI, they speak at OI conferences, they consult with other doctors, and their expertise shines through when they interact with parents. As we began to research OI and speak with other parents of kids with OI, they almost unanimously recommended making the trip to Omaha and having these doctors involved in our daughter’s care.

Additionally, the clinic has a multidisciplinary approach. In just a couple days, we’ll be able to have FangFang do all the testing that is needed to give her doctors the information they need as they determine the best course for her treatment going forward, and see all of the doctors we need to see. We’ll do x-rays to get a good look at her bones and a DEXA scan to measure bone density. She’ll have an audio test (because our hearing is dependent upon the tiny bones in our ears, people with OI are more likely than others to have hearing issues), and we may do bloodwork and run some genetic tests. Then we will meet with a whole team of doctors and other medical professionals, including an orthopedic surgeon, an endocrinologist, an audiologist, a dentist, a physical therapist, an occupational therapist, a nutritionist, and a social worker, each of whom can speak to some facet of FangFang’s condition and give us insight into how best to care for her.

And this girl? In combination with these doctors? She’s going to kick some OI butt 🙂

ff-fierce

These are going to be some long days, but I am oh-so-thankful for the opportunity to go to this clinic and see these experts. We want to do everything we can to care for FangFang as well as possible, and that means getting her to the OI experts who can best advise us and help us to care for her. We’re excited to meet them, excited to hear their thoughts on a treatment plan for FangFang, and excited to get started doing whatever they recommend!

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