Preparing to Parent a Child with OI: What Does that Look Like?

When I first heard of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), I assumed that it just meant that the bones of the person affected by it would fracture more easily than those of other people, but as I shared here, there’s actually a bit more to it than that.

There’s also more to parenting a child with OI than I realized at first, and I’ve spent the last 9 months doing all that I can to learn about that. I began by talking to moms of kids with OI and adults with OI as we were reviewing our daughter’s file. Of course, I also talked with our pediatrician, who consulted with a local orthopedic surgeon, and I made contact with the orthopedic surgeon and endocrinologist who run the OI clinic in Omaha, offering some of the best care in the world for people with OI. All of that was incredibly helpful, and  I don’t want to discount the expertise of medical professionals, but OI is such a rare condition that very few doctors and nurses have experience with it, and I’ve so appreciated the opportunity to learn from the experiences of parents who are living right now the reality of life parenting children with OI.

One of the moms with whom I connected added me to a Facebook group of parents who had adopted children with OI so that I could ask questions there, and those mamas answered so many of my questions. And once we accepted Fang Fang’s referral and committed to moving forward with adopting her, I joined the Facebook group for all parents of children with OI, and that group is an awesome resource, as well. And these parents? They are amazing. Not only do so many of them take such excellent care of their own children, but they also have gone out of their way to pass on their wisdom to me (and to other expectant parents).

One thing I’ve learned from those parents is the importance of having a “break box” on hand at all times, whether we’re at home or out and about. Fractures can happen at any time, and we’ll want to be prepared. It’s true that we could go to the emergency room any time a fracture happens, but an ER visit is not always necessary, and even if it is required, we can do a lot to make our daughter more comfortable before transporting her. We should have medication available to address spasms and pain as a first line of defense. Then we should have splinting supplies, so that we’re able to immobilize limbs and splint any fracture at any time.

Another mama actually sent me a whole stash of supplies for the beginning of a break box, each labelled with instructions for use!

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You cannot believe how excited I was to get that box! I also started to add to it gradually as I learned more myself. There isn’t anything like a book you can read about how to parent a child with OI or even about OI itself, but I’ve gleaned so much wisdom from reading other parents’ posts in the Facebook group for parents of kids with OI, seeing what challenges other families face and what advice they receive.

This month another mom who sometimes travels through our area for work stopped by our house and gave me a whole morning of her time to talk about parenting her daughter who has OI and give me a hands-on splinting tutorial! What an amazing blessing! Fortunately, both Miranda and Madeleine CaiQun were willing to help us practice 🙂

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I’ve also learned about the need for a wheelchair – and specifically a wheelchair that is customized for her little body. Fang Fang is tiny, but she is 3, which means she’s at an age at which children are generally able to be mobile themselves. At home, she’ll be able to crawl or scoot, but that’s less socially acceptable at places like Target, and we’ll need to be able to facilitate her independent mobility. Additionally, we need to anticipate fractures. We don’t know when or how they’ll occur, but we do know they’ll occur, likely to major leg bones at some point, so we need to be prepared, and that means having a wheelchair available. We’ll also likely need a gait trainer and/or walker for her at some point, but we’ll wait for her physical therapist to weigh in on that.

I’ve been challenged to be an advocate for Fang Fang, even in medical contexts. I got a bit of a taste of that after Matt’s heart attack in February, but this will be more of a sustained need. Because OI is such a rare condition, I need to be an expert, and I need to be willing to discuss medical procedures and treatments with doctors. I need to ask that her blood pressure not be taken unless absolutely necessary, because the tightness of blood pressure cuffs can cause fractures. In case of fractures, I need to insist that I position her for x-rays, because well-meaning medical professionals who are not experienced in working with individuals affected by OI sometimes don’t know how to move limbs without causing further injury.

I’ve asked many questions of our pediatrician and of other OI moms, but I’ve also been seeking out other resources. I talked with the HR department at Mizzou to help me figure out which insurance plan would offer us the best financial coverage for all the needs we expect to have in the next year. There are two amazing mamas to kids with special needs who are part of our church, and both of them have been so gracious in answering my many questions. I’ve also talked with our local school system. And I’ve made contact with a local organization supporting individuals with disabilities. I have the information I need in order to get her set up with all the local support for which she’ll qualify as soon as she gets home.

By nature, I’m really a very dorky person, so I have actually enjoyed doing all this research and learning as much as possible about OI and how to care for Chen Fang once she’s home. Even if that weren’t the case, though, I believe I owe it to her to prepare as well as possible for her arrival, and I’m doing all I can to make that a reality!

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